Spring 2015 Resident and Visiting Fellows

Harvard’s Institute of Politics (IOP), at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, today announced two additions to its 2015 IOP Spring Fellows class. The IOP was established in 1966 as a memorial to President Kennedy and aims to inspire, motivate and encourage undergraduates to consider careers in politics and public service.

Check Out Our Director's Internships: Internships & Career Services

The Director’s Internship Program, with over 100 public service internships, makes the dreaded process easy. You can work at The Clinton Foundation, Cato Institute, Facebook, United States Department of State, The South Korean National Assembly, CNN, etc. Every facet of public service is within your grasp. And conveniently, they are all the same application.

Students Helping Employees: IOP Citizenship Tutoring

Citizenship Tutoring is a program that gathers undergraduate tutors to teach and guide Harvard employees seeking U.S. citizenship. The tutors are trained by the Harvard Bridge Program, an education program for Harvard faculty and staff. Each tutor is then matched with a Harvard employee who is currently in the process of applying for US citizenship. For a couple of hours each week, the pairs meet to study topics ranging from US history to the structure of government to recent current events.

Announcing the Spring 2015 Resident Fellows

Harvard’s Institute of Politics (IOP), at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, today announced the selection of the 2015 IOP Spring Resident Fellows. The 2015 Fellows roster reflects expertise in law enforcement and legal affairs, political communications, campaign and digital strategy, journalism and political leadership in state, local and federal government.

The Public Service Project: A Renewed Confidence in Millennials

The United States has a problem. Well, the country has a lot of problems, but I would like to focus on one in particular: our citizens’ voices are not being heard in the ways that they should be at the most fundamental level of government. Voting is broken–and government has broken it. From the local level to the highest branches of government, our states’ redistricting laws have–in effect–rigged elections to the point that voters do not have the strongest voice in choosing their representatives.

Millennial Must-Read: New Frontier Awards Offer Inspiration


Authored by Jacob Morello '15.
I had the privilege of attending the 2014 New Frontier Awards on Wednesday at the JFK Presidential Library in South Boston, and left inspired and invigorated. Each year, the JFK Library and the Institute of Politics partner to honor two young public servants under the age of 40—one elected, and one involved in community service and advocacy work. This year’s winners were Svante Myrick, Mayor of Ithaca, NY and Nina Dudnik, Founder and CEO of Seedling Labs. Both have made tremendous contributions to the world, and their stories were empowering for myself and the other undergraduates present at the reception and dinner.

The Public Service Project: Engaging Students at the University of Rochester

After returning from the National Campaign Conference, my fellow ambassador, Rachel Goldberg, and I met with the Committee for Political Engagement (CPE) and discussed our plans to engage students at the University of Rochester based on what we had learned at the conference. During this time, we focused on how to make politics more relatable to students on campus and on showing students that politics have an impact on their daily lives. Through inspiration from Rock the Vote’s recent TurnOutForWhat music video, we decided that we needed to show students how the issues they care about connect to politics. With the support of the Rochester Center for Community Leadership, we created a photo campaign.

The Public Service Project: The Problem with Redistricting Reform: Where do we start?

The United States has a problem. Well, the country has a lot of problems, but I would like to focus on one in particular: our citizens’ voices are not being heard in the ways that they should be at the most fundamental level of government. Voting is broken–and government has broken it. From the local level to the highest branches of government, our states’ redistricting laws have–in effect–rigged elections to the point that voters do not have the strongest voice in choosing their representatives.

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